June 6, 2019
Gardens

In the garden: cabbage, herbs and pretty polyanthus

Plant Some Cabbage

A great source of Vitamin C, calcium and fibre, cabbage is such a healthy addition to your home patch. Stagger plantings of four at a time for a constant supply and keep watch for caterpillars and butterflies.

How to grow:
Find seedlings at your local nursery that are suited to that season – many different varieties suit different times of the year, so be careful to choose the appropriate plant for you. Cabbage plants love our climate and can grow year-round in a full-sun position. Water regularly, but keep well-drained and use a liquid fertiliser every three to four weeks for the best crop.

When to harvest:
The cabbage will be ready to harvest in 10 weeks, when the head is firm. Don’t leave too long after it’s of a good size as they taste best when picked early.

 Herbs At Home

Many herbs require a little treatment before heading into winter and some, like sweet basil, can be removed as they break down in the wetter months. Herbs including rosemary, thyme, and oregano can be pruned, but many of the other common herbs that sail through winter require only a light trim. Mint, chives and sage can be tidied up and cut back if necessary and plants such as parsley and coriander can be replanted. Cut back any straggly plants and as with all growing plants, fertilise once a month with Powerfeed. As spring approaches, give a light snip and they’ll be back in business.

Pretty Polyanthus

The happiest plant to have in your garden. Polyanthus’ glowing faces are an easy pot of colour to liven up any garden and you’ll often find the inexpensive compact pots at local nurseries.

How to grow:
Plant in a shady spot for prolific flowers that will last for two to three years. In well-drained soil and with regular feeding, keep the plant moist from the first planting. When planting out, settle with Seasol in damp soil, and keep watch for eager snails.

In flower:
Polyanthus are long-lasting winter colour, with domed clusters of brightly coloured blooms. The trademark pop of yellow in the centre contrasts with a rainbow of petal shades in doubles and singles.

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