My South Australian Life

Mar 1, 2020
My South Australian Life

“I’m surprised I’ve lasted this long considering the hard living”

Rob Riley has lived the quintessential rock and roll life. He’s played in front of 120,000 people with Rose Tattoo, toured with Jimmy Barnes and Sherbet, and spent years drinking, smoking and snorting. Here, Rob reflects on life in the rock spotlight, losing his close mate Shirley Strachan and settling down with a Seaton girl.

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Feb 23, 2020
My South Australian Life

“Life really is too short to spend it doing things that don’t bring you joy”

Eboney Sheehan was living in Sydney, had a great job, good mates and life was on track. All that changed last year when she found a lump in her breast. Here, the 35-year-old, who works in construction in SA, talks about her battle with cancer and her passion to raise funds for “cold caps” - a method to help people undergoing chemotherapy keep their hair.

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Feb 16, 2020
My South Australian Life

“It was a few words that changed my whole life”

Musician Nathan May, 25, has pioneered a mentorship program for at-risk youth in Adelaide’s north and he’s met Barack Obama – an encounter that changed his life. He’s also a proud indigenous man, descended from the Arabana and Yawuru clans, and he’s had to deal with racism his entire life – even at a recent corporate event in Adelaide where he was an invited guest. Here’s his story.

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Feb 9, 2020
My South Australian Life

My longest day: I don’t really remember it beginning and ending

Susan Neuhaus is an Adelaide surgeon and ex-army officer who has operated in war zones, helped sex workers in Cambodia and been awarded the Conspicuous Service Cross. Here she talks about her life – from childhood in Mt Gambier, to the fortuitous way she found herself in medical school, to her challenges in the military and as a cancer surgeon.

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Feb 2, 2020
My South Australian Life

Crows captain Chelsea Randall: How adversity made me

In our new Sunday series, we take an intimate look at the lives of fascinating South Australians - in their own words. To begin, football trailblazer Chelsea Randall talks about her journey from a kid thrown into a boys' team, to her position as one of the most respected athletes in Australia, and how she almost gave the game away along the road.

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